My shopping routine is a little intense, but since I’ve started using it religiously I’ve been earning a lot more rebates, saving a lot more with coupons, lowered my grocery budget by 25% while eating better food, stopped shopping in the grocery store except for quick trips, and I’m saving a lot on gas when I have to fill up the car each week. So, while it’s a little complicated, I definitely think it’s worth the time. First, here’s the list, then I’ll go into how each step works.

  1. Check out sales for Kroger
  2. Look up ecoupons, printable coupons & rebates that match sale items
  3. Order groceries online through ClickList.
  4. Day of grocery shopping, buy Amazon gift card to get the fuel points, if I will be doing any Amazon shopping
  5. Pay with PayPal to get 1% cash back
  6. Use fuel points from grocery shopping, Clicklist feedback surveys & gift card purchases to save on weekly fill up.
  7. Use Swagbucks to shop on Amazon to get reward points, if I can earn 5SB or more per dollar spent.
  8. Submit receipts from shopping to ReceiptPal and ReceiptHog
  9. Snack order from Love with Food (automatic)
  10. Use leftover money to make bulk purchases from Jet and Boxed

1.Check out sales for Kroger

I used to shop at a lot of stores, but I don’t anymore. I explain why in this blog post.

2. Coupons & Rebates

I love using coupons, but I hate spending time on them. My rule of thumb is I try to save 50% on all snack foods and convenience foods I buy for my husband’s work snacks and our travel snacks. I use my SwagBucks coupons to earn me SB if I can, or I use my own if we’re talking about printable coupons, but I also use eCoupons pretty much every week.

3. Order Groceries

ClickList and I are BFFs. Seriously. I pay $4.95 per order and they get all my groceries ready and get them loaded into the car for me. I can use paper coupons, so I can still take advantage of great sales and coupon savings combined and it’s awesome. I save so much time, and with having Logan and Autumn both, it’s just easier to not have to coordinate nap time and all that around big grocery store trip. I already have a pretty solid routine that helps keep things sane with me working from home with both of the littles and I don’t like to mess with that too much if I don’t have to.

4. Amazon gift cards

I do a lot of shopping on Amazon, so I realized a little while back that I was missing out on getting Fuel Points for the money I was already spending anyway, so I started getting my Amazon cards there. I usually wait until they are doing a double or quadruple points weekend, saving my Amazon budget money until the cards give me a ton of fuel points, then buy them and get tons of fuel points.

5. Cash Back

love using my PayPal card, and since it’s a debit card I don’t have to worry about anything like the temptation to overspend because it’s a credit card or anything like that. But I get 1% back, which is great. 1% isn’t a ton, but it’s better than the nothing I would have gotten with my usual bank card. We don’t use the rebates for our ‘normal’ budget, but I apply them to our debt snowball.

6. Fuel Points & Gas Savings

Once I’ve gotten the groceries, I go to the Kroger gas station and do our weekly fill-up, where I rarely save less then $0.40 a gallon. Of course, I also use my PayPal card here and get 1% cash back. It adds up!

7. Amazon Shopping

I love using companies like Ebates, but I don’t ever use them for Amazon because I’ve never gotten money back from them for my Amazon purchases. I guess I just shop in the wrong categories. I use my SwagBucks account to make any purchases and it adds up pretty quickly. To maximize my SBs earned using the principles I talk about in this post, I make a lot more and save a lot when I redeem them for gift cards… it’s a great system.

8. Submit Receipts to Reward Programs

There are amazing benefits to using receipt rewards, like free gift cards! These gift cards paid for more than one week of groceries, special at-home date night treats and other splurges. We’ve also used them to pay off debt.! I use to ReceiptPal and ReceiptHog, although I’m a lot more faithful to to using ReceiptPal because they automatically take my email receipts from my email inbox, and since I use my PayPal debit card for almost everything, basically all of my transactions are automatically sent to them. I like ReceiptHog too, but automatically earning gift cards is a lot easier. Right? 😉

9. Snack Order

I realized after Logan was born that I had been sabotaging our grocery budget by not getting snacks. We are very snacky people. Between me being hungry all the time because I’m a human milk factory, and Ian wanting to have something quick and easy to eat on his breaks at work that travels well – it all added up to us spending a lot of ‘just a little snack’ money that wasn’t in the budget. I did two things that made a huge difference.

The first thing I did was get a Love with Food Subscription. I tend to get into a habit where I buy the same things week after week, which is fine by me but Ian loves variety. He talks a lot about how when he was a kid how he ended up eating a lot of the same things over and over (especially pasta) so it just makes him crazy. It’s one of his quirks, and I don’t really mind. So I decided to get the Love with Food membership so we would have fun new things to try, but I wasn’t going to be spending a fortune.

10. Ordering online with Jet and Boxed

love ordering from Jet and Boxed, it’s like having a Sam’s Clup or Boxed membership. I love Jet because you can buy small or large quantities, which is great when I don’t need huge quantities of things. I always meet the minimum for free shipping, so I really save a lot.

I love ordering in bulk from Boxed. Their things are a lot more like a big box store (go figure) and they come in big packs. I love them for their wine selection and household items like laundry soap, they are a staple for normal day-to-day items.

This system has helped me cut my budget so much. It has been a huge help toward us getting out of debt faster, because it’s just that much more we can set aside for student loan debt. Every little bit counts.